Eitjes koolwitje

The first native species; Large white

Eitjes koolwitje

Large White eggs

The animal species I’ve photography so far for Development were either classic pets or species that are not native to the Netherlands. The difficulty with our ‘own’ animals, is that many of them are protected by law and you are not allowed keep them in captivity. Fortunately, I found a native species that I can photograph for my project; a Great white butterfly. Read more

Australische flappentak

A very fast little stick

Australische flappentak

A while ago, I´ve written a blog about the Giant prickly stick insect eggs I´ve bought. What looked easy – you buy some eggs online, wait until they hatch and take pictures of the little animal – turned out to be a bigger challenge than I thought. First of all, you can’t take for granted that if you buy eggs they will actually hatch and if you finally have a baby stick insect to photograph, it turns out to be a lot less calm as its name suggests. Read more

Griekse landschildpad

First reptile species; Hermann’s tortoise

Griekse landschildpad

This week, after a few weeks summer break, I could finally start with a new series for Development. This is the first reptile species, Hermann’s tortoise. It’s also a new chapter in growth rate. Where for example Canary’s grow very quickly and the challenge is to not miss out on any important stages of their development, tortoises are the opposite; they are very slow growers and it takes several years for them to reach their final size. Read more

Triops

Development in micro size; tropical Triops

Triops

I’m always looking for new species to photograph for Development. Sometimes I go to a breeder to do the photo shoot on location, but it can also be more convenient to breed a species myself. That way, it’s easier to combine the project with other commercial assignments. A while ago, I found an ad on the internet for eggs of a species I’ve never heard of; tropical Triops. Today, I’m the proud owner of a complete Triops breeding set. I’m hoping that in the next few weeks I’ll be able to start breeding these peculiar animals. Read more

Eitjes van de Australische Flappentak

Planning the first insect series: Giant prickly stick insect

Eitjes van de Australische Flappentak

Lately, I’ve been working on photographing and selecting as many different animals as possible. I started with mammals and have already added fish, bird and a snail species to the project. I hope that I can add a reptile and amphibian species as well soon. But I would also like to document the growth and development of an insect. I already did some research on little creatures in my garden and even started with some ladybug eggs, but my attempt to raise them, failed. Primarily, because their food, louse, would walk right out of their enclosure through the ventilation holes. Hopefully my next attempt with the Giant prickly stick insect will be more successful. Read more

Serinus canaria

The fast growers of the animal kingdom; canaries

Serinus canaria

Last week, I’ve been able to finish another series for Development; the growth of a baby canary into a real bird. It’s hard to imagine, but at only three weeks old, these little guys already look just like an adult bird and it’s hard to tell who are the parents and who are the chicks. It’s really remarkable how fast they grow. To make sure I could capture every phase of their development, I had to adjust my schedule and plan a photo session every three days. Read more

Lepidodactylus lugubris

New project; Mourning gecko’s

Lepidodactylus lugubris

It all started with a post from one of my friends on an aquarium forum. Now, a few weeks later, I’m the proud owner of three Lepidodactylus lugubris or Mourning gecko ladies. They are really fun little creatures, with a very extraordinary characteristic; they are parthenogenetic. This means that they can more or less clone themselves, so they can reproduce without a male. Hopefully they will start laying eggs in the next couple of months, so I can follow the development of these remarkable animals. Read more

Hypancistrus L201

Second fish species; Hypancistrus L201

 

Hypancistrus L201

Hypancistrus L201 eggs

This week, I started with the 9th series for Development of another catfish species; Hypancistrus L201. I expected that it would take a while before my fish would start breeding, but yesterday I discovered the first eggs. A big surprise, because my fish are still very small/young and I thought they were all male… Read more